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Shipston was recommended to us by my late mum in law who used to frequent the WI’s embroidery group that met at the Catholic Church rooms. She described Shipston as a compact little town that had all that we as a family would need. She was particularly fond of the playing fields of the primary school, that she looked out onto from the windows of the church rooms.

We took her up on her word and have not been disappointed. We have been resident in ‘Sheep Wash Town’ for the last 18 years bringing up two well-balanced children. Both are now at university at Undergraduate and Masters levels.

My husband Rob is an environmental manager and I work for the NHS at Warwick Hospital in the Aseptics pharmacy department where we make medicines for Cancer treatment. My career has been mainly in the Education , Health and the Care sectors.

Regarding interests, I enjoy sports, reading and cooking. Rob and I also spend time walking, enjoying the brilliant countryside that we are blessed with around us. Due to my son’s influence, we are also novice level but avid surfers.

Shipston has been and continues to be a wonderful home town for me and for us as a family. It has a special place in my heart (one tends to put down roots in the place where you grow your family). Having been a recipient in this town I believe that I am at a stage in my life where I want to take my serving of the people and the town to the next level, hence applying to become a councillor. I trust that I will do the role justice and I am very much looking forward to getting stuck in.

Watch the Video here: https://vimeo.com/645816045/df5035a727

 

A Warwickshire town’s Remembrance Sunday service was able to reach far more people than ever before thanks to a big screen showing it live in the town centre.

Shipston-on-Stour Town Council hired a big screen to broadcast the service from inside the town’s church, St Edmund’s, which can only fit a few hundred people inside.

The screen was installed above Lloyd’s Bank in High Street, close to where the parade started its procession.

Those wishing to pay their respects but who could not enter the church due to its limited capacity were then able to stay in High Street and watch the service safely.

And plenty of people did so, with many returning to High Street after the wreath-laying at the memorial to watch the indoor service.

The use of the big screen coincided with the 100th anniversary of the Royal British Legion and the first ever Poppy Day.

The funding for the big screen was provided through the Welcome Back Fund, from the European Regional Development Fund money through the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government.

The programme is managed by Shakespeare's England on behalf of Stratford District Council.

Grants are given to projects that help to attract local residents and visitors alike into high streets or town centres post-Covid.

Cllr Ian Cooper, Shipston’s mayor, thought the big screen was a great addition to the service and meant turnout was a lot higher than in previous years.

He said: “We were so happy with what the screen brought to our Remembrance Sunday service this year.

“Turnout in Shipston is usually very good for Remembrance Sunday, but in the past we often had people hanging around outside St Edmund’s as they weren’t able to get inside. They had no way of knowing what was happening or when the service would finish.

“The big screen changed all that. It allowed residents to gather safely in High Street, watch the service and pay their respects in a much more inclusive way than what was possible before.

“We would definitely consider using the screen again in subsequent years – it worked really well.”

Mike Wells, chairman of the Shipston branch of the Royal British Legion, added: “Anyone wishing to quietly reflect during Remembrance Sunday should be able to do so, and the big screen allowed more people than ever in Shipston to watch the service.

“St Edmund’s is a lovely church, but its size means we cannot fit everyone in. But this year, having the big screen allowed more people than ever before to view the service. I think it was a great addition to the day.”

And Glyn Slade, Welcome Back Event Manager from Shakespeare’s England, said: “Projects funded through the Welcome Back Fund are supposed to attract people back onto the High Street, which is exactly what Shipston’s big screen did.

“It was fantastic to see so many people come out to watch the service on the screen and pay their respects to the fallen.”

Shipston’s Remembrance Sunday service was able to reach far more people than ever before thanks to a big screen showing it live in the town centre. An online livestream of the service was also made available for people to watch, including residents within Shipston Residential Care Homes, the Ellen Badger Hospital, Royal Hospital Chelsea.

The big screen was hired by the Town Council to broadcast the service from inside St Edmund’s, which can only fit a few hundred people inside. It meant those wishing to pay their respects but who could not enter the church due to its limited capacity could watch the parade make its way through the centre of town and watch the service safely.

The use of the big screen coincided with the 100th anniversary of the Royal British Legion.

The funding for the big screen was provided through the Welcome Back Fund, from the European Regional Development Fund money through the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government.

The programme is managed by Shakespeare’s England on behalf of Stratford District Council.

Grants are given to projects that help to attract local residents and visitors alike into high streets or town centres post-Covid.

 

Armistice remembered

The High Street fell silent at 11am on 11th November in memory of those who fell during the First World War. Bob Pitts from the Town Band played the Last Post preceding the silence and sounded Reveille following its conclusion.

As a young man, I lived in Stratford but my career took me away for 20 years until I had the opportunity to relocate to Shipston 16 years ago with my wife, Jane, and our 4 children who have since progressed through the Shipston Schools and moved on into their own careers.

I am already known to many people in the town having previously served as both a scout leader and as a youth leader for several years. For the last 10 years, I have had the pleasure of serving the town as a Community First Responder, something that I remain passionate about.

Career-wise I have been a store manager in a variety of well-known brands like Woolworths, B&Q and Wickes. I am currently a procurement professional working for Bromford Housing Group, a charitable public organisation providing affordable housing solutions. In my spare time, I enjoy travelling and eating out and also having simple nights in.

Throughout my life, I have been committed to helping and supporting people in the community. The opportunity to represent Shipston as a councillor is both an honour and a challenge that I hope will allow me to help make a positive difference for the